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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 366 (some duplicates have been removed)
the various instruments are going to be used. science teams working together for five or ten years or more interpret the data that returns and discuss which of the engineers what is interesting and possible to do next. so, at its heart the story of the planetary exploration today is about the relation of people and robotic spacecraft. machines never actually complex laboratory capable of operating in extreme cold with little power package to handle the vibrations and worked for years without repair. sending the scientific instruments throughout the solar system is one of the great successes of the computer age, and there will surely marked our place in history and science and exploration but these missions also show that we understand how to design machines and organize people so everything fits and that's my story today about the exploration rovers how the design of the spacecraft as you see mer, the organization of people, the software tools and the schedule makes it possible for scientists to work on mars. in the skill of the universe, mars is next door about nine months travel using co
the best workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need atat our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in hf and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's,and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack oma and i approve this message. >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5:00, on your side. >> today marks the tenures since the terrifying day when there was a shooting -- today marks 10 years since th
a group of political science students from san jose state who watched the debate together last night downtown. after it was all over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room, yeah, they had to admit, romney gets the slight edge. >> overall, romney from my perspective did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> a political science professor from san jose state telling us, she thinks romney will get a nice bump in the polls from that debate. she adds whether that bumps come in the all-important swing states where the race is still very tight that, remains to be seen. >>> here's a question, historically how much impact do presidential debates have on an election when it's all said and done? we asked that question to a professor of political science at santa clara university. >> that's a good question. in 2004, john kerry won the first debate against president bush. and in 1984, reagan stumbled in the first debate against mondale and it didn't seem to hurt them very much. it will be interesting to see as the polls c
will give me a chance to have a mini "west wing" reunion. and a member of the science commit me who thinks science is aloif from the pit of hell. and he thinks he's a scientist. also tonight steve mor continue -- martin decided to do his political commercial, one of those guys, steve martin or bob kerrey will join me to explain why steve did that. ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> coming up, mitt romney tried to play a moderate at the debate last week. this week, paul rien's going to give it a shot. he's never played that part before. ryan versus biden is next. former nebraska senator bob kerrey will talk about his race to get back into the senate and how he talked steve martin in to helping him. a republican congress man says the bible teaches us all about society. that's coming up. [ dog 1 ] i am not a vegetarian! yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add pl
sciences and biotech discoveries. -- vio lifbio life scientists ad biotech discoveries. u2 -- for making that a cause for future generations and we will discover in that corridor those live science drugs that will help us end these dreadful diseases for generations to come. thank you, lieutenant governor. [applause] i wanted to welcome the delegates who come here under the leadership of the vice minister and of course in his capacity as not only the vice ministry of commerce, but also the china investment and promotion agencies and to the many companies are here in attendance, you represent that cross-section of companies from diverse backgrounds and discipline throughout the bay area. i want to welcome you here to this great seminar to wish you a great conversation and an intelligent one, and one that hopefully will discuss the many more ways that we can not only do business, but to work together to solve the world's problems. this is what happens here in san francisco. we cannot just talk about the problems. we will try to discover ways to solve them. this is, i think, the essence of w
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
, the rogue's gallery of republicans who don't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and it's membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td amerit
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
. we have the latest lessons in science and history from the gop. stay with us. >> we all like pbs. i mean, i have grand kids, they love big bird and burt ander ni and so forth, but we borrow money effectively from china to make sure our kids don't have to watch advertising on pbs. my view is it makes sense to stop borrowing many and let our kids get used to corn flakes. >> sesame street was brought today by the letter "g" for grouch. the capital one cash rewards card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn accent ] 50% more simoleons. [ western accent ] 50% more sawbucks. ♪ [ maine accent ] 50% more clams. it's a lobster, either way. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card. with a 50% annual cash bonus, it's the card for people who like more cash. [ italian accent ] 50% more dough! what's in your wallet? a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be diffi
dignitaries cut a piece of crime scene tape to officially open the new lab. >> forensic sciences will specialize particularly in dna testing, firearms and fingerprints and will have a fully functioning public health lab as well. >> reporter: gone are the days when evidence collected from rape victims sat on shelves untested and dna from cold cases went unanalyzed. >> it was a lot of work and i lot of advocacy. but can i tell you why i'm really here? i'm here for the moms of homicide victims who they labored so long and so hard to try to get this lab built and victims of sexual assault who were victimized twice when their rape kits weren't tested. >> reporter: kathy patterson help put the lab's initial pieces in place. first two floors of the building house the crime lab where firearms will be tested and fingerprints examined. the dna lab, which for the last two years occupied space in lorton, now has a permanent home. an entire floor will house the city's morgue where autopsies will be done. there is even a toxicology lab. >> to reduce this to what it is all about, it is more lik
think he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds be
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointeted d in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle income families by 4,000 a y
the senate until the kink of junk science opened his month. with the senate in the balance, let's talk about favorite senate races and surely what's going on in missouri never ceases to amuse me. the crazy uncle has been let out of the back room and into the party. he keeps talking and he keeps staying alive. he's only 3 points behind. missourians are saying we don't like either people. who do we like least, best, bad, worse. it's problematic both ways, but the gop has refunded to todd akin to supporting him, newt gingrich has endorsed him, rick santor santorum, i believe you like him, too. >> i do. >> they both endorse him. it seems that the gop once running from todd akin has said winning the senate at all costs is valuable. >> some in the gop, some. >> it's interesting, you know. missouri there's a mirror image situation in massachusetts. missouri is a red state that doesn't really like the republican candidate personally. you look at massachusetts, and another key senate race. this is a blue state that really likes the republican person, scott brown, whose re-election is critical to taki
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. the last 16, and fanatical and
treatment. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger
and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in demand of your products that justify the need for more manufacturing, more employees and there is a point in fact for us in 2012 our volume is less than it was last year. there is not a lot of justifica
of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals the course of the atrocities of the past. but i think it is useful to remind ourselves that the plaintiff considering atrocities that the path is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible thing we've done to our fellow h
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low, for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i both agree, we have to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar and bio-fuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order foritous do it, we to have to close our deficit. one of the think thises i am sure we will be discussing is how do
to uphold the constitution. >> reporter: rachel caufield is a professor of political science at drake university and a research fellow at the american judicature society. she thinks it's the family leader and other conservative groups around the country, that are inserting money and politics into the judicial system. >> i think we have a movement afoot to politicize our courts and in politicizing our courts i think basically that undermines the quality of justice in america. there's definitely a trend nationwide. we've seen a huge increase in campaign spending among judicial candidates, many of whom are supported by similar interest groups. >> reporter: according to the nonpartisan group called justice at stake, from 2000 to 2009, money spent on state supreme court justice races jumped more than two and a half times to over $206 million. in iowa in 2010, money spent, mostly from out of state totaled over $1.2 million to unelect the three justices there with ads like this -- >> if they can redefine marriage none of the freedoms we hold dear are safe from judicial activism. to hold acti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 366 (some duplicates have been removed)